JOHANNESBURG, July 26 (Reuters) - South Africa's Aspen Pharmacare (APNJ.J) will supply the first batch of Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N) COVID-19 vaccine to the country from July 26, the drugmaker said on Monday.

It will be the first set of vaccines to be manufactured in the country from active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) - substances used to make the final drug product - sourced from Europe, Aspen said.

South Africa's vaccination drive suffered a major setback in April after U.S. Federal Drug Administration halted production of J&J vaccines at a plant in Baltimore run by Emergent Biosolutions Inc (EBS.N) after it was found to be contaminated. read more

Aspen, which has been contracted by J&J to manufacture the vaccines in South Africa in a process called 'fill and finish', had been sourcing APIs from the Baltimore plant and was asked to destroy 2 million doses as part of the finding of the FDA.

 

The supplies will also be distributed to other African countries under the African Vaccine Acquisition Task Team under which J&J has committed to supply 220 million doses of the single shot vaccine, Aspen said.

Africa's dependence on imports of COVID-19 vaccine has left it vulnerable to repeated waves of the coronavirus, raising demands for vaccine production facilities in the continent.

It has administered just 60 million vaccine doses in a population of 1.3 billion due to restrictions on shipments from vaccine producing nations. read more

South Africa's Biovac Institute struck a deal with Pfizer (PFE.N) last week for a "fill and finish" arrangement to produce 100 million vaccines by 2022-23. read more

 

"Supply for Africa and South Africa is particularly rewarding, given the current global inequality in accessing vaccines," Stephen Saad, chief executive of Aspen said in a statement. "This represents a big step forward in ensuring that Africa can address its healthcare priorities."

Reporting by Promit Mukherjee Editing by Tomasz Janowski

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

The World Health Organization's chief scientist has advised individuals against mixing and matching Covid-19 vaccines from different manufacturers, saying such decisions should be left to public health authorities.

"It's a little bit of a dangerous trend here," Soumya Swaminathan told an online briefing on Monday after a question about booster shots. "It will be a chaotic situation in countries if citizens start deciding when and who will be taking a second, a third and a fourth dose."

Swaminathan had called mixing a "data-free zone" but later clarified her remarks in an overnight tweet.

"Individuals should not decide for themselves, public health agencies can, based on available data," she said in the tweet. "Data from mix and match studies of different vaccines are awaited - immunogenicity and safety both need to be evaluated."

The WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on vaccines said in June the Pfizer vaccine could be used as a second dose after an initial dose of AstraZeneca, if the latter is not available.

A clinical trial led by the University of Oxford in the UK is ongoing to investigate mixing the regimen of AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines. The trial was recently expanded to include the Moderna and Novavax vaccines.

European vacationers had hoped this year’s northern hemisphere summer would see unhindered movement and be largely free of travel restrictions, but countries across southern Europe are now scrambling to re-impose pandemic curbs amid alarm at rising cases of the delta variant, a highly contagious coronavirus strain first detected in India. 
  
Spain, Portugal, Greece, Cyprus and Malta were among the first countries to start reopening earlier this year but now they are tightening entry restrictions on vacationers who have not received both jabs of the most used vaccines — Pfizer and AstraZeneca.  
 
France and Germany are cautioning citizens against vacationing in Spain and Portugal. And Germany has added Cyprus to its list of “countries of concern” — unvaccinated Germans who do visit the island will have to self-isolate on their return home. 
  
The piecemeal moves by national governments mirrors what unfolded last year when national governments shunned pleas from Brussels to act collectively and tested the Schengen arrangement of freedom of movement.  
 
Abruptly announced restrictions are also adding to the woes to the continent’s airline, tourist and hospitality industries. They had been harboring hopes of a strong business rebound the next couple of months, enough to start repairing the severe economic damage the pandemic has inflicted on them.  

People walk at Carcavelos beach amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Cascais, Portugal, July 8, 2021. REUTERS…
People walk at Carcavelos beach in Cascais, Portugal, July 8, 2021.

They fear a patchwork of constantly changing restrictions, dampening demand, spelling doom for many tour operators and hotels that have managed to hang on and stay in business. But the national governments’ re-imposing entry rules are unrepentant about the tightening not long after deciding to relax measures and encourage travel. 
  
"We all want to go on holidays but health protection is fundamental,” French foreign minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told a news conference in Madrid Friday.

People swim and enjoy a sunny day at "Les Cigales" beach in Port-Grimaud, with Saint-Tropez in the background, southern France…
FILE - People swim and enjoy a sunny day at 'Les Cigales' beach in Port-Grimaud, with Saint-Tropez in the background, southern France on July 10, 2021.

French officials, like their counterparts in neighboring countries, fear a delta wave even though coronavirus numbers currently across much of the continent are low, dreading a massive jump in numbers much as Britain has experienced the past few weeks. 

Rising infection rates 

“This variant is dangerous and quick and wherever it is present, it can ruin the summer,” Gabriel Attal, a French government spokesman, told reporters Friday. Infections in Paris have almost doubled in a week.   

People sit after they received a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine as the country extends vaccination to curb surge among…
FILE - People sit after they received a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine as the country extends vaccination to curb surge among population under 30, in Madrid, Spain, July 12, 2021.

The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control has issued a string of warnings, saying the Delta variant is 60% more transmissible than other variants.  

“Based on available scientific evidence, the Delta variant is more transmissible than other circulating variants, and we estimate that by the end of August, it will represent 90% of all SARS-CoV-2 viruses circulating in the European Union,” ECDC’s Director Andrea Ammon said in a statement recently. 
  

Restaurant staff checks a digital vaccination certificate at the entrance, on the day that Portugal's government imposed…
Restaurant staff checks a digital vaccination certificate at the entrance, on the day that Portugal's government imposed stricter rules in an attempt to bring under control a surge of COVID-19 cases, in Porto, Portugal, July 10, 2021.

The fear is that the delta variant could quickly spread among the unvaccinated. According to ECDC around 40% of adult populations in EU countries have not been fully immunized.  According to national health authorities, the delta variant already accounts for more than half of new cases in Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium. 
  
Italian health authorities have reported a slight increase in new confirmed cases. Italy’s health ministry reckons the delta variant accounts for around a third of the new cases. “After 15 consecutive weeks of descent, there is an increase of 5% in new cases compared to the previous week,” according to Dr. Nino Cartabellotta of the Fondazione GIMBE, an independent medical think tank.  
 
Writing in a monitoring report issued Friday, Cartabellotta stressed, though, that the amount of testing being conducted is “too low,” leading, he suspects, to an “underestimation of new cases”. The health ministry reported 1,390 new coronavirus cases Friday.  
 
Brussels and the ECDC are urging national governments to spend up their vaccination programs.

On Saturday, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said the EU had delivered enough coronavirus vaccines to cover 70% of the bloc’s adult population. But she said that with Delta now accounting for over 40% of new cases in France, 70% in Portugal, and more than 30% in Spain, there is no room for complacency.  
 
“COVID-19 is not yet defeated. But we are prepared to continue supplying vaccines,” Von der Leyen said in a video statement. 
  
Last week, Lithuania announced the reintroduction of restrictions for arrivals from overseas. Arrivals from countries deemed “high risk,” EU or otherwise, will now have to follow stringent testing and quarantine procedures. Slovakia is also tightening entry rules, not based on the coronavirus risk of countries but on whether travelers have been vaccinated or not. 
  
Belgium plans this week to announce new measures for arrivals from Portugal, involving testing ten-day quarantines for the unvaccinated.  
 
Aside from Portugal, north European alarm is increasingly focused on Spain, among the first countries in Europe to reopen to tourists earlier this year. The country’s 14-day case rate has soared to 215 cases per 100,000 people. In response, authorities in the north-east region of Catalonia ordered nightclubs and discos to close again, weeks after allowing them to resume business. 

Source - Read more.

The head of the World Health Organization said drugmakers should not try to provide coronavirus booster shots to wealthy nations when many poor nations have yet to receive a first dose of vaccines for much of their population.

At a press briefing in Geneva, Switzerland, on Monday, WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the priority should be to vaccinate people who had not received any doses. 

He called on drugmakers Pfizer and Moderna to "go all out to supply COVAX," referring to the U.N.-backed initiative to distribute vaccines globally, as well as to target vaccine distribution to low- and middle-income countries.

Pfizer said last week it was seeking U.S. federal authorization for a third dose of its COVID-19 vaccine to be used as a booster shot.

"The global gap in COVID-19 vaccine supply is hugely uneven and inequitable. Some countries and regions are actually ordering millions of booster doses before other countries have had supplies to vaccinate their health workers and most vulnerable," Tedros said.

He said the disparity meant "we are making conscious choices right now not to protect those in need."

Captain Jackeline Guillen gets a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from an Health Ministry worker at a military barracks in Mariano Roque Alonso, Paraguay, July 12, 2021.
Captain Jackeline Guillen gets a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from an Health Ministry worker at a military barracks in Mariano Roque Alonso, Paraguay, July 12, 2021.

WHO has said that more than 70% of all vaccines have been administered in just 10 countries.

Pfizer said it was meeting with U.S. health officials Monday to discuss its request for booster shots, which it said would boost immunity and protect people against the more contagious variants of the coronavirus.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Federal Drug Administration said Friday they don't believe Americans need another shot yet.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden, acknowledged that booster shots may be needed, but he said Sunday it was too soon for the government to recommend another shot. Roughly half of the U.S. population has been fully vaccinated.

In other developments Monday, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson confirmed that all remaining lockdown restrictions in England will be lifted in a week, despite a rise in cases blamed on the more contagious delta variant.

Johnson said during a news conference in London that people should "proceed with caution" when the restrictions are lifted.

"I cannot say this powerfully or emphatically enough — this pandemic is not over," he said.

Indonesia said Monday it set a new record of daily COVID-19 infections, with 40,427. The country is experiencing a surge of cases of the highly infectious delta variant, first identified in India.

Oxygen tanks are prepared for patients in the hallway of an overcrowded hospital amid a surge of COVID-19 cases, in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, July 9, 2021.
Oxygen tanks are prepared for patients in the hallway of an overcrowded hospital amid a surge of COVID-19 cases, in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, July 9, 2021.

India's Health Ministry reported Monday that the country's daily tally of new COVID-19 cases fell below 40,000 in the past 24 hours. It reported 37,154 new cases since Sunday. 

In South Korea, the professional baseball league suspended its season Monday after five players from two teams tested positive for COVID-19.

The country said Monday it had recorded 1,100 new coronavirus cases on July 11, the highest ever recorded on a Sunday. The rising caseload comes as South Korea imposes new restrictions in Seoul and neighboring regions to curb the spread of infections.

Meanwhile, in Uganda, Chris Baryomunsi, a government minister, said his country had the money to buy vaccines but was having trouble purchasing them from Western countries.  

"This is a challenge of access and equity," Baryomunsi, who is also an epidemiologist, told The Guardian newspaper. "We have the money, but we simply can't get the vaccine. … We have to rely on the Western world, and the Western world has focused on its population. The impression is that people there don't care about Africans."

A man with a cough but who had not been tested for the coronavirus uses COVIDEX, a locally-made herbal medicine approved by the government for use as a supportive treatment for viral infections, in Kampala, Uganda, July 6, 2021.
A man with a cough but who had not been tested for the coronavirus uses COVIDEX, a locally-made herbal medicine approved by the government for use as a supportive treatment for viral infections, in Kampala, Uganda, July 6, 2021.

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center reported nearly 187 million global COVID-19 infections early Monday and more than 4 million global deaths. The U.S. has the most cases, with 33.9 million, followed by India, with 30.9 million.

Johns Hopkins reported that nearly 3.5 billion vaccines have been administered worldwide.

Some information for this report came from Reuters and The Associated Press.